D’you know….? January 22, 2015 – Posted in: Uncategorised – Tags:

That is the question I have to deal with at least 10 times a day – it seems more acute since my daughter started knitting. Yep, she did. About two weeks ago. Ever since then I get asked questions that are not really questions like

“D’you know that I really love Samantha’s yarn?”

“D’you know that I really love knitting?”

“D’you know that I looooove the yarn you gave me?”

Those are just samples of the apparent deep love for knitting my daughter has discovered. Well. The love of talking about knitting. And the love of accumulating knitterly things. And having a list of projects to the moon and back. Though I do have to admit that she knits a few stitches per day, sometimes even a row on the scarf she is working on now.

Egg knits

I am thrilled.

Now, do you know that I am also not done talking about knitting?

Today we’re still working on the fine-tuning. This time we’re fine-tuning selvedge stitches. Or selvage stitches. (I do not know why there are two spellings, but if you encounter either of them, it is the same thing.)

When I knit a garment in pieces, I do not knit specific selvedge stitches, I keep the first and last stitch in stockinette – this makes seaming much easier.

The reason is that selvedge stitches only get knitted every second row, and otherwise you slip them. I do find that produces holes when seaming. Picking up stitches is also much easier if you have all the rows to work with and not only half. However if you have a piece of knitting that won’t be seamed (scarf, etc.) you might want to use a selvedge stitch.

When working a selvedge stitch starting with a knit stitch, you want to slip it knit wise with yarn in back (see, we’re kind of picking up where I left off) and work to the end of the row. If you slip this one purl wise it will be loose and does not look good, in short: it really does not do what it is supposed to do. So make sure you slip it knit wise.

If the first stitch is a purl stitch, you want to slip the stitch purl wise with yarn in front and then do whatever you do to the end of the row. I am not saying it is impossible to slip this one knit wise, but it sort of works against the knitting when you try to do that.

I hope this helps with cleaning up your edges – when you feel like it.

Happy Knitting, as ever!

– Mona